Clinical trials for two more experimental coronavirus vaccines have been approved in China.

This is done in a bid to combat and beat the deadly pandemic ravaging the world, officials said.

The vaccines use inactivated coronavirus pathogens, and the approvals pave the way for early-stage human trials, Wu Yuanbin, an official from China’s Ministry of Science and Technology told a regular press briefing.

China now has three different clinical trials for three possible coronavirus vaccines in the works.

China’s state food and drug administration on Monday approved one vaccine developed by a Beijing-based unit of Nasdaq-listed Sinovac Biotech, Wu said.

Another vaccine, being developed by the Wuhan Institute of Biological Products and the Wuhan Institute of Virology, was approved on Sunday, he added.

Beijing approved the first trial for a vaccine developed by the military-backed Academy of Military Medical Sciences and Hong Kong-listed biotech firm CanSino Bio on March 16.

That day the US drug developer, Moderna said it had begun human tests for their vaccine with the US National Institutes of Health.

Video: China Approves Coronavirus Vaccines
Video: China Approves Coronavirus Vaccines

“Vaccination of subjects during the first phase of clinical trials and the recruitment of volunteers for the second phase of clinical trials began on April 9,” Wu said.

“It’s the world’s first novel coronavirus vaccine to initiate Phase II clinical studies.”

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There are currently no approved vaccines or medication for the COVID-19 disease, which has killed more than 120,000 people worldwide and infected nearly two million.

Chinese teams were also racing to develop vaccines using other methods including using attenuated influenza virus vectors or injecting specific nucleic acid.

Several of these projects are currently undergoing animal testing and quality inspections, Wu said.

“The vaccines using the above technical methods are expected to be submitted for clinical trials in April and May,” he added.

Experts have raised hopes that a vaccine could be ready within 18 months.

Author

Ukamaka Doris, a graduate of Mass Communication, from Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka has a flair in writing and news reporting which led her into blogging. Previously, Ukamaka Doris has worked as an editor at primepost.ng and presenter at Unizik FM, 94.1, Awka. Ukamaka Doris can be contacted via phone call at 08167016206

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